Who is Paulo Freire?

Produced by: 
The Freire Charter School
Year: 
2005
Duration: 
00:19:12

Individual Film Price:

Higher Education Institutions & Government Agency DVD | $49.95
K-12 & Public Libraries DVD | $49.95
Home Video DVD License – Restrictions Apply | $20.00

 

 


Community Visions Compilation Price:

This video is available for purchase as part of a Community Visions Vol.12 compilation DVD.

Higher Education Institutions & Government Agency DVD | $139.00
K-12 & Public Libraries DVD | $79.00
Home Video DVD License – Restrictions Apply | $20.00

 

 


Scribe Video Center Program:

The Community Visions program teaches documentary video-making skills to members of community organizations in Philadelphia, Chester and Camden (NJ). A powerful way to document community concerns, celebrate cultural diversity, and comment on the human condition, Community Visions is a part of Scribe’s mission to explore, develop and advance the use of video, film, audio and interactive technology as artistic tools and as tools for progressive social change.

 


Project Facilitator: Ellen Reynolds

 


Film Summary:

Named for the Brazilian educational philosopher, Freire Charter School is an innovative, college-preparatory high school in Center City Philadelphia. The school is known for academic excellence and its distinctly Freirian emphasis on individual freedom, critical thinking, and experiential learning. Programs such as the PEACE Project provide students with individualized, self-designed curriculums. But in Freire Charter’s seventh year, some PEACE students realized that few at Freire knew much about the school’s namesake. Who is Paulo Freire? is the result of a collaboration between 7 students and 2 adults who set out to understand Freire, a radical educator and a Marxist who wrote the influential book Pedagogy of the Oppressed, and figure out how his contributions to education philosophy and social justice apply to their own lives. Field trips and Freire’s writings guide students on a journey into the social dimensions of their own education. With their characteristic analysis of oppression and focus on student-teacher dynamics, Freire’s ideas are challenging for students and teachers alike. “It really is frightening for an educator to really truly implement a Freirian method in the classroom,” says Brian Lundberg, a Freirian scholar working with the school, “because it upsets the balance of power.”