Traveling the Avenue: A Story of History, Faith, Culture and Civic Action

Produced by: 
Germantown Historical Society with Scribe Video Center
Year: 
2005
Duration: 
00:10:03

Individual Film Price:

Higher Education Institutions & Government Agency DVD | $49.95
K-12 & Public Libraries DVD | $49.95
Home Video DVD License – Restrictions Apply | $20.00

 

 


Precious Places Compilation Price:

This video is available for purchase as part of a Precious Places Community History Project Vol.1 compilation DVD.
 
Higher Education Institutions & Government Agency DVD | $139.00
K-12 & Public Libraries DVD | $79.00
Home Video DVD License – Restrictions Apply | $20.00

 

 


Scribe Video Center Program:

The Precious Places Community History Project is a community oral history project inviting members of the Philadelphia region's many neighborhoods to document the buildings, public spaces, parks, landmarks and other sites that hold the memories of our communities and define where we live. Precious Places teaches the video production process to participating groups, fostering projects authored by those who intimately know the featured neighborhoods.

 


Videomaking Consultant: Marlene Patterson and Carter Baker
Humanities Consultant: Richard Green
Post Production: Carter Baker

 


Film Summary:

Germantown, originally known as German Township during its colonial days, is rich with history. The area has numerous historic sites, places of worship, and cultural institutions, making this area one of Philadelphia's great treasures. Through it runs Germantown Avenue. In Traveling the Avenue: A Story of History, Faith, Culture and Civic Action, the Germantown Historical Society takes the viewer on a mini-tour of six diverse points of interest along the avenue. Included are Mt. Zion Baptist Church, founded in 1871, and St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic church, founded in 1851, two institutions that are deeply rooted in the neighborhood and which continue to offer a variety of community services. The documentary then pays a visit to the ornate Germantown Town Hall, and then the Johnson House, once home to an abolitionist family and an important stop on the Underground Railroad. Moving along down the avenue, the viewer visits Sedgwick Cultural Center, which once contained an Art Deco movie palace and still features a variety of programming. Finally, the viewer arrives at the entrance to Wissahickon Park and Valley Green, a tributary valley rich with natural beauty, historical artifacts, and the nation's oldest "friends" park care taking group. Whether you are new to Philadelphia or hail from Germantown itself, this documentary will prove a delightful journey through the historic neighborhoods of northwest Philadelphia.

 


Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

October 14, 2007 | Broadcast on WHYY-TV

 


Film Stills: