Community Visions

Teens on Sex

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Youth Health Empowerment Project and Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Dina Mendros and Roxana Walker-Canton

Year released: 
1998
Length: 
18 minutes

An informative look at adolescent sexual health by an eclectic group of Philadelphia teens and teen peer educators of the Youth Health Empowerment Project. The video was collaboratively made with Y-HEP teen volunteers who powerfully deconstruct myths ("You can't get pregnant your first time."), address common concerns, and give useful, experience-based advice to their peers.

Filmmaker's Name: 
The Youth Health Empowerment project, Dina Mendros & Roxana Walker- Canton
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Youth Health Empowerment Project (Y-HEP)is a project of Philadelphia FIGHT that offers a comprehensive range of health promotion and youth development programs using a harm reduction approach to at-risk youth.

Dina Mendros is a member of Temple University's Women's Film & Video Collective and recently completed Temple's Master's program in Anthropology. A former writer for the Philadelphia City Paper, she is currently at work on a video documentary about a New York school for cross-dressing.

Roxana Walker-Canton is a filmmaker, author, professor and television host who currently works as visiting professor of media studies at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT.

Press: 

May 7, 1999 - "Film Talks to 'Teens on Sex'", by Gary Thompson, Philadelphia Daily News

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

May 6, 1999 - Part of the Festival of Independents at Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema, International House (Philadelphia, PA)

Who Pays? We Pay! : The Cost Of Health Care Fraud

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by Center for Advocacy for the Rights and Interests of the Elderly (CARIE) and Scribe Video Center

Year released: 
1998
Length: 
12:19 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

This video from CARIE's Healthcare Fraud Education Project examines the price older Americans must pay when healthcare fraud -- particularly in the cases of Medicare and Medicaid, government health insurance plans that primarily protect senior citizens -- goes unchecked.

Should you balk when your doctor offers to pay you for every Medicare or Medicaid eligible patient you refer? Why were you billed not once, but twice, for services you never received? What should you say when a friend asks to use your Medicare card?

Filmmaker's Name: 
CARIE
Filmmaker's Bio: 

CARIE, Center for Advocacy for the Rights and Interests of the Elderly, is a non-profit organization, based in Philadelphia, dedicated to improving the quality of life for vulnerable senior citizens in the Delaware Valley. CARIE'S programs include, The CARIE LINE that includes outreach to the Latino community, The Philadelphia Long Term Care Ombudsman Program, The Providing Advocacy for the Victimized Elderly program, The Education and Training Program, Policy/Legislative Program, Community outreach and special events, and the Health Care Fraud Education Project featured in this documentary. CARIE is a leader in providing direct assistance to the elderly, their families, and professionals in the aging field.

We Hope This Message Is Getting Through

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by Kensington Action Now, Kensington Area Revitalization Project & Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Kensington Action Now, Kensington Area Revitalization Project & video facilitator Gretjen Clausing

Year released: 
1991
Length: 
16 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

When over 35 playgrounds closed in the Kensington area of North Philadelphia, local teens, seniors and other adults mobilized to give neighborhood youths recreational opportunities that went beyond playing jacks or stickball. Eager to reintroduce more wholesome youth activities like soccer and skating parties to the local landscape, Kensington Action Now (KAN) teamed up with exuberant -- and rapping! -- neighborhood teens and worried adults to produce this video documenting its two-year struggle to increase city funding for year-round public recreational facilities and programs.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Kensington Action Now & Gretjen Clausing
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Kensington Action Now (KAN) began in 1975 with a meeting of concerned community leaders from the Kensington area of North Philadelphia. This coalition of civic, church and business groups has been concerned with and worked on general conditions in their neighborhood. Their work on housing problems led to the incorporation of the Kensington Area Revitalization Project (KARP) in May 1980. Today KARP works on the acquisition, renovation and sale of abandoned properties.

Gretjen Clausing is an independent media programmer and activist, who has made her home in Philadelphia since 1989. Prior to joining Scribe's staff in September 2004, she was the Program Director of Film at the Prince where she created a new repertory film program with strong emphasis on work by emerging and established artists, music related media and programs soliciting audience engagement at the Prince Music Theater. She is a founding member of the Philadelphia Coalition for Public Access, a grassroots group that has been working since 1999 to get public access television activated in Philadelphia. She has worked at Scribe as a part-time facilitator since 1990. She joined Scribe as Program Director and Producer of the 2005 NAMAC conference in 2004.

Press: 

February 8, 1993 - Brief mention in "Expressing Themselves," by Ann Kolson, The Philadelphia Inquirer

We Are All In This Together

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by the Community Mental Health and Mental Retardation Services (COMHAR) & Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Sharon Mullally

Year released: 
1993
Length: 
15 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

In the United States, 1 in 5 people suffer from mental illness at one point in their life and another 7.5 million people are mentally retarded. Until the 1970's, many of those with the greatest needs were housed in government institutions. But when those institutions were slowly closed due to either inhumane conditions or new governmental funding priorities, many found themselves in living in group homes or with their loving, but often ill-equipped families.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Sharon Mullally
Filmmaker's Bio: 

Founded in 1975, Community Mental Health and Mental Retardation Services (COMHAR) helps people of all ages and cultures in the community who have developmental disabilities, mental health concerns, physical limitations and other challenges. Though this video focuses on a COMHAR branch serving three North Philadelphia neighborhoods, COMHAR provides assistance at home and a broad array of services at multiple COMHAR locations throughout Greater Philadelphia and lower Montgomery County.

Sharon Mullally began her career with 10 years in staff positions at broadcast television stations in Philadelphia and Baltimore. Since leaving the commercial broadcast industry to pursue documentary work, Sharon has edited several national PBS programs for WHYY-TV 12 in Philadelphia, including The Dinosaurs!, Furniture on the Mend, and Remember When. For her editorial work on Yearbook--The Class of '65, produced by Fox Philadelphia, she received an Emmy Award in 1996. Recent editorial work includes I Witness, a one-hour documentary on the anti-abortion violence in Pensacola, Our Food Our Future, a look at community food projects, and Daring to Resist, a beautiful and compelling portrait of three young women who resisted the Holocaust. All three of these programs have been shown on public television.

As Producer/Director, Sharon has just completed Rufus Jones: A Luminous Life, a documentary on a visionary American Quaker. She has also completed New Voices, a documentary on women moving from welfare to work; Peace Theater and Building a Peaceful Community, teaching self-respect and conflict resolution skills to children; Walk With Me, Sisters (winner of the Silver Apple Award from the National Educational Media Network), for women with HIV; and Connecting the Pieces: A City's Response to the AIDS Quilt. Sharon has also maintained an active role as an instructor, teaching media literacy to middle school children in Philadelphia. She has taught editing classes at Scribe Video Center.

Press: 

February 5, 1993 - "Premiere of New Community Programs," Scoop U.S.A. newspaper
February 8, 1993 - "Expressing Themselves," The Philadelphia Inquirer

Public Screenings, Broadcasts and Festivals: 

February 10, 1993 - Community Visions premiere at Neighborhood Film/Video Project at International House (Philadelphia, PA)

Soks "Save Our Kids"

Producer of the Work / Filmmaker: 

Produced by Princeton Atelier and Scribe Video Center

Filmmaker Facilitator: 

Louis Massiah, Charlene Gilbert and Carlton Jones

Year released: 
1997
Length: 
10 minutes
Price: 

$20 for individuals / $35 for Community Institutions ie: libraries, schools, non-profits / $50 for Universities & Businesses

Buy this Video: 

To purchase a DVD please call 215 222 4201 or email inquiry@scribe.org.

"When I was a child, Princeton was a real small community — everybody knew everybody," says SOKS founder Hank Pannell, whose goal was to recreate the small community of his childhood. "Princeton has the same needs as any inner city," observes SOKS member Tom Parker, "but the problems are being overlooked because it is Princeton." The men involved with SOKS all have the same mission — to make a difference in the lives of young African-American boys, ages 10 through 16, growing up in the Princeton community.

Filmmaker's Name: 
Princeton Atelier
Filmmaker's Photo: 
henrypannellSOKS.jpg
Filmmaker's Bio: 

The idea for Princeton University's Princeton Atelier was sparked by novelist and Professor Toni Morrison's experiences collaborating on a song cycle, Honey and Rue, commissioned by Carnegie Hall for opera star Kathleen Battle. That project brought her together with André Previn who scored the music for the piece. In the Atelier program, Professor Morrison tries to capture the same excitement this collaborative experience offered her. The Atelier brings together on campus guest artists from different media for an intensive, in-residence collaborative effort with each other and Princeton's faculty and students. The focus of the Atelier is on the process of creating a work of art rather than on the finished product, and guest artists bring to campus an idea they want to create, explore, and develop. The "SOKS - Save Our Kids " videotape was produced in an Atelier directed by Louis Massiah and facilitated by Princeton students.

The "SOKS" program works to further community identification and provide high quality mentoring, recreation, and learning opportunities for young males in the Witherspoon area of Princeton, New Jersey.

Press: 

September 10, 1997 - "Toni Morrison's Atelier: Students and professionals join forces to create art from the heart," by Deborah A. Kaple, Princeton Alumni Weekly

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